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NATIONAL ORGANISING COMMITTEE

National Organising Committee Members

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Associate Professor Richard Franklin PHD is Co-Director of the World Safety Organization (WSO) Collaborating Centre for Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion, College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Australia. A/Prof Franklin is a pracademic who uses an evidence based approach to developing real world solutions to improving health, safety and wellbeing with a focus on rural populations using a public health approach to injury prevention. He has worked on a range of project with a emphasis on drowning prevention, farm safety, workplace health and safety, rural road safety, masculinity, alcohol & drugs, and disasters. He teaches into the Master of Public Health around the foundation public health issues, public health in the workplace, and public health management. He has been involved in the development of a range of strategies to prevent injuries and is current Co-Convenor of the Injury Prevention Special Group of the Public Health Association of Australia.  He also supervises a range of masters and doctorate students in public health and injury prevention.

Injury Prevention Special Interest Group Convenor and Vice President - Finance, Public Health Association of Australia; Associate Professor for Public Health - Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion, James Cook University

Associate Professor Richard Franklin - Convenor

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Terry Slevin has been Chief Executive Office for the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) since May 2018.  He is Adjunct Professor in the School of Psychology at Curtin University an Adjunct Professor in the College of Health and Medicine at the Australian National University.  He is a Fellow of PHAA and was the first Vice President (Development) of the Association.

Adj Prof Slevin is a regular media commentator on all aspects of public health and cancer, ranging from causes and early detection, to broader chronic disease prevention including nutrition, physical activity, weight control, alcohol, sun protection and gun control.  He also has a special interest in Occupational and environmental cancer risks.

 

Until April 2018 he was Director, Education and Research at Cancer Council WA where he worked since 1994. Adj Prof Slevin holds a Masters in Public Health and an Honours degree in Psychology.

As well as serving as Chair of Cancer Council Australia’s Occupational and Environmental Cancer Risk Committee, Adj Prof Slevin has previously chaired Cancer Council's Skin Cancer Committee and was founding Chair of Nutrition and Physical Activity Committee, where he served for 10 years.  He has contributed to the planning of the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) World Cancer Congress from 2012 to 2016 and was Co Chair of the Scientific Committee for the World Cancer Congress in Kuala Lumpur in 2018.

He is the editor of a book on skin cancer Sun, Skin and Health, released by CSIRO Publishing in 2014 and has published over 70 papers in the peer reviewed literature and a series of 15 articles on cancer myths.  

 

His current focus is on promoting evidence based public health policy in Australia with a focus on equity and improved health outcomes for the most disadvantaged Australians.

CEO, Public Health Association of Australia

Adjunct Professor Terry Slevin

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Dr Ben Beck is the President of the Australasian Injury Prevention Network (AIPN) and is Deputy Head of Prehospital, Emergency and Trauma Research at Monash University, Australia. Dr Beck leads a broad body of trauma and injury prevention research, with a focus on identifying emerging injury trends, quantifying injury burden, monitoring and improving trauma systems, and developing injury prevention strategies for all road users, with a particular focus on pedal cyclists.

President, Australasian Injury Prevention Network (AIPN), Deputy Head of Prehospital, Emergency and Trauma Research at Monash University, Australia

Dr Ben Beck

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Professor Rebecca Ivers is Head, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, UNSW Sydney, professorial fellow at the George Institute for Global Health, and National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Senior Research fellow. Ivers leads a global research program focusing on the prevention and management of injury, with a particular focus on inequalities in injury in low income settings, and the prevention of injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. She currently leads research on fracture care, fall prevention, burn care and on prevention of injury in children and adolescents, and is involved in ongoing work on drowning prevention in Bangladesh.

Her work has a strong focus on implementation, sustainability and capacity development. Ivers has worked extensively with the World Health Organisation and co-directs a WHO Collaborating Centre in Injury Prevention and Trauma Care. She is immediate past president and current executive council member of the Australasian Injury Prevention Network.

Head, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, UNSW Sydney

Professor Rebecca Ivers

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Xin Li is the Senior Work Health and Safety Consultant: Systems and Audit at the Australian National University and is an Executive of the Australasian University Safety Association. Xin has worked broadly in Australian universities, holding roles as an academic, in management, and working as a WHS professional. As a leader in WHS in the Higher Education and Research sector across the Australasian region, Xin promotes the system thinking and approach to injury prevention and safety promotion from a work safety perspective utilising technological innovation, research translation, WHS professional, and industry-wide action as tools to achieve a safer future for workers in Australia and worldwide. Xin’s involvement in World Safety 2020 commenced in 2016 as a member of the National Bidding Committee where he worked closely with PHAA and Adelaide Convention Bureau to attract the conference to Adelaide.

Senior Work Health and Safety Consultant, Systems and Audit, Australian National University, Executive, Australasian University Safety Association

Mr Xin Li

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Amy has extensive experience in drowning prevention research, policy and practice. She has authored 39 peer-reviewed articles to date as well as over 55 professional reports. Amy has been a key contributor to the last three Australian Water Safety Strategies. In her current position as National Manager – Research and Policy with Royal Life Saving Society – Australia her duties include the production of the National Drowning Report, maintaining the National Fatal Drowning Database, analysing policy and evaluating programs. Amy is a PhD candidate at James Cook University researching the epidemiology, risk factors and prevention strategies for unintentional river drowning. Amy is a member of a range of committees and reference groups including the Australasian Injury Prevention Network (AIPN) and the Australian and New Zealand Safe Boating Education Group (ANZSBEG)

National Manager, Research and Policy, Royal Life Saving Society, Australia

Ms Amy Peden

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Professor Kathleen Clapham PhD, BA Hons (Anthropology) is Professor (Indigenous Health) in the Australian Health Services Research Institute (AHSRI) at the University of Wollongong and Visiting Professorial Fellow in the Injury Division of The George Institute for Global Health (University of Sydney). Kathleen is an Aboriginal Australian; a descendent of the Murrawarri people of north-western NSW.  The major focus of Kathleen’s research is Indigenous health and wellbeing, community based interventions and health services research aimed at improving the health and safety of Indigenous people. Kathleen’s key publications have focused on injury in the Indigenous population, Indigenous child health, injury prevention and enhancing the capacity of Aboriginal communities to address health and safety issues.

Professor (Indigenous Health), University of Wollongong.

Professor Kathleen Clapham

190426 thumbnail_ProfilePic_Marlene Long

Marlene Longbottom is from Roseby Park mission (Jerrinja), the Yuin Nation of the Dharawal and Dhurga language groups of the South Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Marlene is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Australian Health Services Research Institute (AHSRI) at the University of Wollongong. Her recently completed PhD investigated Aboriginal women’s experiences of violence and support services in the Shoalhaven region. Marlene has also implemented numerous community based research projects with Aboriginal communities based on her critical Indigenous feminist theory, critical race theory and intersectionality lens. She previously worked as an Aboriginal Health Worker in urban, rural and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, delivering direct service delivery in health and human services. Her approach to research is one of enacting social justice; it is emancipatory and brings forth the voices of populations whom may otherwise be silenced; it ensures Aboriginal communities are active research participants and not passive objects of study.  Marlene's postdoctoral research involves an international study of Aboriginal communities in South Eastern NSW in Australia and Native Hawaiian communities in the United States, in order to gain a broader understanding of how systems respond to Indigenous families who experience trauma and violence.

Vice Chancellor’s Aboriginal Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Wollongong

Dr Marlene Longbottom